Library for Health Care Providers

Journal of Applied Research on Children: Informing Policy for Children at Risk, Vol. 2:1, Article 8

Health Care Providers’ Training Needs Related to Human Trafficking: Maximizing the Opportunity to Effectively Screen and Intervene

R. Isaac, J. Solak, A. Giardino — March 15, 2011

Discussing: (1) Prevalence in the U.S. and internationally; (2) Definitions related to human trafficking; (3) U.S. laws; (4) Domestic vs. international victims: A continuing challenge; (5) Health risks; (6) Health care response; (7) Community Needs Assessment: National; (8) Health care setting: Identifying and interacting with trafficking victims; (9) Response and treatment; (10) Training approach for health care providers; (11) Developed Intervention Program.

Journal of Applied Research on Children: Informing Policy for Children at Risk

Health Care Providers’ Training Needs Related to Human Trafficking: Maximizing the Opportunity to Effectively Screen and Intervene, Journal of Applied Research on Children: Informing Policy for Children at Risk

R. Isaac, et al. — March 15, 2011

Cites study showing that 28% of victims came into contact with the health care system at least once during captivity; concludes this presents a crucial opportunity for identification/intervention, medical/psychological care for victims in captivity; explores health care issues associated with trafficking victims and training needed by frontline health care providers in order to effectively respond, including a model intervention program on how to identify, refer, report potential trafficking victims.

Free the Slaves and Human Rights Center, University California, Berkeley

Hidden Slaves: Forced Labor in the United States

September 2004

Discusses: (1) What is Forced Labor? (2) Identifying Victims; (3) The Number, Geographical Distribution, Origins, of Victims; (4) Victims’ Economic and Demographic Sectors (Prostitution/Sex Services, Domestic Service, Agriculture, Sweatshops); (5) U.S. Legal Response to Forced Labor (Domestic Legislation, U.S. Relation to International Trends); (6) Implementation/Enforcement of U.S. Laws; (7) Health and Medical Consequences of Forced Labor; (8) Social and Legal Services; (9) Recommendations.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Administration for Children and Families

Human Trafficking Into and Within the United States: A Review of the Literature, prepared for Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE)

August 2009

Review of literature on human trafficking into and within the United States, focusing on issues of identifying and effectively serving trafficking victims. Discusses: (1) What is Human Trafficking; (2) How Prevalent is Human Trafficking Into and Within the U.S.; (3) Who are the Victims of Human Trafficking (Commonality, Risk Factors, Minor Victims, Runaway/Homeless Youth); (4) What are the Needs of Trafficking Victims; (5) How are Victims Identified; (6) Available Services (Adults, Minors); (6) Barriers to, Challenges in, Accessing/Providing Services; (7) Promising Services/Strategies (Trauma-Informed Programming, Involving Survivors in Developing/Providing Services, Identification, Education/Outreach, Prevention, Intensive Case Management, Housing/Shelter Services, Legal Services, Medical Services, Social Services, Trauma Therapy, Substance Abuse Treatment).